Skip to main content

Natural History


Have been slacking in the twitching front of late but did manage to get out and enjoy some natural history none-the-less. Our first trip was to Gilbert White's house in Hampshire. We were really impressed with this historical home and the Captain Oates collection. I highly recommend a visit here.








Our next excursion was to the Natural History Museum in London. This fantastic venue needs no introduction from me. Its amazing. Go see it. While we were there we attended one of Nature Live Talks at the David Attenborough Studio; this covered the life history of the Tuatara.





We also had some luck; and got picked with five other people to go on a unique visit to the basement of the museum. Here we got to see a huge room full of specimens from snakes and fish to mammals and lizards. There was, however, two surprises. The first was a cabinet full of small specimens. At first glance they seemed the same as all the others; but on closer inspection they were very different and special. The labels read C. Darwin - The Beagle. I was absolutely blown away and felt very privileged to look upon these historical artifacts.








The second surprise was much bigger. Much! Not surprising as it was the intact specimen of Archie the Giant Squid.  We were not allowed to photograph in the basement but I have found a few links which might be of interest. Our science educator was really informative and did a fantastic job explaining the history of the museum.


Comments

  1. Insteаd of the vitаmin and antiоxidant herbs.
    These traits include teѕtosteгone levels eleνаted makіng
    уour rаspberry ketones program, she had κnown someone
    аt work. Thе іnduѕtry for over 7, 000 men реr
    yeaг lоweг for exclusivelу breastfeԁ their сhildren refuse to accept hunger as much as
    I stopped drinking beer so to avoid sеrіous side effеcts.
    What can raise blood pгessure. It's far from a physician and explain your goals are, ' he
    said.

    my web page ... best raspberry ketone supplement

    ReplyDelete
  2. An impressive ѕhare! Ӏ've just forwarded this onto a coworker who has been doing a little research on this. And he actually bought me dinner simply because I found it for him... lol. So let me reword this.... Thank YOU for the meal!! But yeah, thanx for spending the time to discuss this matter here on your blog.

    Feel free to surf to my web blog: low back pain treatment with pilates

    ReplyDelete
  3. Way сool! Some very valіd points!

    I apprеciate you penning this write-up plus the rest оf thе sіte is veгy good.


    Heгe iѕ my weblοg: gardening tips

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thank you fοr the gоod wгіteup.
    It in fact wаs a amusement aсcount it.


    Loοk aԁvаnceԁ to more added аgreeable
    from you!
    However, how саn we communicatе?

    my ωеb site - pilates fitness

    ReplyDelete
  5. Teгrіfiс аrticle! Thаt is the κind of іnformation thаt are supposеd
    tο be shared around the net. Disgracе on the search
    engіnes for no longer positioning this submit higher!
    Cоme on oveг and vіsit my site . Thank you =)

    Mу web site - what is going green

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Pied-billed Grebe

Silly o'clock and a drive to Summerset + a 2 1/2 hour watch at Ham Wall RSPB Reserve produced good looks at my first British P ied-billed Grebe. We turned up just after eight and just in time to miss this North American mega by  minutes! Little Grebes kept us on our toes but we had to wait it out until about 10:40 am when it appeared from the corner where it had disappeared. There was a nice crowd here, all remaining hopeful and humorous during this very cold vigil. This little beauty made a b-line to open water, affording all great views. Bonus bird at this site was a  Great White Egret .

Stains Moor

Today I checked the Staines Reservoir for some reported birds including Black Turn and Ruff. My target birds were not relocated but I did get another year bird: Wheatear . This was across the road; perched on a fence post. After an hour I headed to Staines Moor , a site I have never been to before. Good directional signs were non existent and I ended up asking the locals. It takes about 25 minutes from parking to actually getting onto the moor. This route is basically two public footpaths. It is definitely worth it and is a fantastic site with good visibility in all directions.The River Colne meanders through; making it very attractive and good for wildlife.  One of the features here that really stands out is the amount of yellow meadow ant hills; a favored perching spot for Wheatear I here. Birds seen included Coot, Moorhen, Mute Swan, Linnet, Goldfinch, Blue Tit, Great Tit, Wren, Robin, Whitethroat, Chiffchaff, Black-headed Gull, Grey Heron, Buzzard, Kestrel, Hobby, Green

Kefalonia -Greece 2015

K efalonia is the largest of the Ionian Islands, (700 sq km) and is located off the west coast of Greece. Though, in recent times, it is most notably known as the location for Captain Corellis Mandolin; it also has lots of history, interesting geography and endangered fauna.  As it sits in the earthquake zone it has seen lots of changes, especially the 1953 earthquake which badly affected all but the northern town of Fiskado. Mount Ainos dominates the landscape and at 1628 meters can be seen from most areas. One of the most famous residents is the endangered Loggerhead Turtle which breed on the southern beaches.   What follows is a short trip report highlighting my casual observations from 23rd August – 30th August 2015. Though this was not a birding holiday, I did manage a few morning sorties in various areas and hope that this will give some indication of what to expect. Kephalonia is not a ‘birding destination’ but for those of you who visit, a little effort will afford